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One In Every Crowd

a Studio release
by
Eye 2 Eye

Release Year: 2006

Date Label Catalog # Comments
2006 Musea Records FGBG 4683.AR

Released under the band name Eye To Eye which, in 2009 was changed to Eye 2 Eye.

Added To Proggnosis Database on: 12/10/2006 12:00:00 AM
Entry Last Updated on: 3/9/2017 7:00:00 AM by: DBSilver
  1. Half Of Me (8:08)
  2. Dark Flower Perfume (1:14)
  3. Love And Pain (16:11)
  4. Waiting For... (2:09)
  5. You (5:32)
  6. Private Fears (8:08)
  7. Back On Planet Earth (5:54)
  8. Just Before (2:08)
  9. One Day... (16:52)

Didier Pègues
Drums


Philippe Bénabès
Keyboards


Cécile Carretero
Bass


Benoît Derat
Gutars, Vocals


Amirouche Ali Benali
Guitars


With:

Steve Rothery:  Guitar Solo on YOU

Hassan Hajdi:  Guitar on Private fears

Reviewed by Nuno on 08 Jan 2007


Formed just 3 years ago, the new French act Eye to Eye recently released their debut album. And a good start this is, as One in every crowd promises a lot for the future of this band…

Emotionally intense, like a good symphonic prog album should be, this band transports the listener through known but always enjoyable fields.
There is a connection here to bands such as early Marillion and Pink Floyd (the guitar work is very reminiscent of Guimor and Rothery, this last even appearing in one of the tracks…); Proloud, Scapeland Wish; Songs of The Exile; Saens; Ayeron (from whom they carved a cover track here: Back on Planet Earth) and other Neo-Prog/Contemporary Sympho bands that highly related their sound to the 80’s new prog grounds while mixing it with a sometimes heavier sound. But Eye to Eye juggle very well with this, creating a solid piece of work that is strangely over-reminiscent and yet original.
The compositions are complex and diverse between and within themselves, imprisoning the listener in a maze of emotional landscapes.
There are some minor flaws here and there, where the music tends to become less interesting by the abuse of harder keyboard textures, but overall this does not destroy the major interesting parts. Especially if you like some harder approaches in your Neo/Sympho diet.

This is an intense, vivid and emotional ride throughout familiar fields. And a recommended album for those who have been accompanying the so-called Neo-Prog style since it begun almost 30 years ago. If you are in this group, this will be a welcomed add in your collection.